• kenburns6
  • kenburns6

Pelješac Peninsula

The Pelješac peninsula is so tenuously connected with the mainland that it has the unique character of an island. The first delight that awaits you is the gastronomic haven of Mali Ston. The narrow lagoon dividing Pelješac from the mainland is rich in premium quality oysters, and the village restaurants offer some of the best cuisine in the country.The slender, fingerlike peninsula of Peljesac is coastal Croatia at its most relaxed. Blessed with craggy mountains, sweeping valleys, idyllic coves and fine wines, a glorious place to visit. Two historic towns, Ston and Orebic, bookend the peninsula and the slow, winding drive between them is a very pleasant one indeed; allow an hour, or longer if you stop for wine tastings along the way. The peninsula's third-largest settlement is pretty little palm-lined Trpanj on the northern coast.Vineyards of the Peljesac Peninsula are well known in Croatia and are considered by many to produce the country finest wines. The best-known wine is Dingac (pronounced Ding-ach) which is red wine and is produced around the slopes of  Postup, Dingac and Orebic. Other local wines include Postup and Plavac Mali which is produced in numerous locations along the Peninsula.
Nearby, the town of Ston is encircled by 14th century stone walls, 5.5km long and once including forty towers, which with the backdrop of the mountainous countryside look scarily like the Great Wall of China. These walls were built by the Republic of Dubrovnik due to valuable salt pans and the towns strategic position, and Ston is often called "little Dubrovnik as the streets have the same layout and the same names. The historic salt pans still produce salt for industrial purposes. If you like to have an active holiday with a difference, you can join in salt harvesting, board and victuals provided.